FGM and penis length: genitals, attraction, and desire. 28 Jun 2016

Tuesday, June 28, 2016 Rob 7 Comments

In this episode, how do our genitals affect the psychology of attraction and sex? We look at new research on female genital mutilation and its effects on women's sexuality, and find out whether a woman is more likely to experience an orgasm if her man has a longer than average penis.

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Do Women Have More Orgasms if their Sex Partner has a Longer than Average Penis?
Does FGM Make Women Less Interested in Sex?

Watch out, mate. You’ll have someone’s eye out. Enrique Lin/Flickr

The articles covered in the show:

Booksmythe, I., Head, M. L., Keogh, J. S., & Jennions, M. D. (in press). Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size. Nature Communications, 7, 11597. Read summary

Drasa Jr., K. M., & Vasili, V. (2016). Which female prefer longer penises? International Journal of Science and Research, 5(5), 108-111.

Onyishi, I. E., Prokop, P., Okafor, C. O., & Pham, M. N. (2016). Female genital cutting restricts sociosexuality among the Igbo people of Southeast Nigeria. Evolutionary Psychology, 14(2). Read summary

7 comments:

  1. Has this bloke nicked your music or is it public domain?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7EMuA909ZQ

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  2. It's not directly relevant to this episode but have you ever read this? It gives us an idea about how people behaved and acquired mates in prehistoric times.

    https://www.amazon.com/Yanoama-Narrative-Kidnapped-Amazonian-Kodansha/dp/1568361084

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  3. The music I use isn't public domain, and has to be licensed from VideoCopilot.net. But others will have licensed it and it's not unusual to hear it elsewhere.

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  4. I haven't read that book, but I have read a couple of books by Napoleon Chagnon, the anthropologist who has done most research on the Yanomamo. Sounds like the Yanoama book might come to similar conclusions.

    I am wary about concluding that this means people behaved this way in our ancestral past, because humans didn't evolve under the prevailing conditions in the Amazon. Still, it does suggest circumstances under which we might expect to see behaviour of this kind.

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  5. >I am wary about concluding that this means people behaved this way in our ancestral past, because humans didn't evolve under the prevailing conditions in the Amazon.

    Why do you think that? What's so unusual about the Amazon? The same behaviours have been observed in other "tribal" populations without governments to control them such as the native Americans and aboriginal Australians a few centuries ago.

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  6. I am not saying that the comparison is entirely inappropriate, rather that we shouldn't assume that Amazonian natives live under the same selection pressures as all human ancestors lived in Africa for many thousands of years: the pressures under which our psychology evolved. Of course, there are many, many similarities. But there are some psychologists who disagree that we should extrapolate even from tribes like the Hadza, whose lifestyle probably represents the ancestral state most closely.

    But we are probably 95% in agreement here.

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  7. Oh come on, the Hadza aren't living like prehistoric humans did. Most of them live in camps set up by the Tanzania government and there's only about 300 of them running about in the wild hunting and gathering. There's evidence that they practiced warfare and raiding in the past when they lived in bigger populations and before they came into contact with civilisation.

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